Trump’s campaign manager confirms that he broke the law by seeking investments in Cuba

HEMPSTEAD, NY - SEPTEMBER 26: Donald Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway stands in the spin room after the Presidential Debate at Hofstra University on September 26, 2016 in Hempstead, New York. The first of four debates for the 2016 Election, three Presidential and one Vice Presidential, is moderated by NBC's Lester Holt. (Photo by Michael Bocchieri/Getty Images)

By Mark Sumner   – – – – –

This morning, reports emerged that Donald Trump illegally did business in Castro’s Cuba.

A company controlled by Donald Trump, the Republican nominee for president, secretly conducted business in communist Cuba during Fidel Castro’s presidency despite strict American trade bans that made such undertakings illegal, according to interviews with former Trump executives, internal company records and court filings.

… with Trump’s knowledge, executives funneled the cash for the Cuba trip through an American consulting firm called Seven Arrows Investment and Development Corporation. Once the business consultants traveled to the island and incurred the expenses for the venture, Seven Arrows instructed senior officers with Trump’s company—then called Trump Hotels & Casino Resorts—how to make it appear legal by linking it after-the-fact to a charitable effort.

Not surprisingly, Trump surrogates have been confronted by this story today, and no one has been more vigorous in her defense of Donald Trump than campaign manager Kellyanne Conway.

Read the entire story. It starts out with a screaming headline, as it usually does, that he did business in Cuba. And it turns out that he decided not to invest there. They paid money, as I understand, in 1998 — and we’re not supposed to talk about many years ago when it comes to the Clintons.

Yeah. Who knows what the Clintons were up to in 1998? Anyway, there’s just one little problem with Conway saying that Donald Trump spent money looking for investments in Cuba but decided not to buy.

Documents show that the Trump company spent a minimum of $68,000 for its 1998 foray into Cuba at a time when the corporate expenditure of even a penny in the Caribbean country was prohibited without U.S. government approval. But the company did not spend the money directly. Instead, with Trump’s knowledge, executives funneled the cash for the Cuba trip through an American consulting firm called Seven Arrows Investment and Development Corp. Once the business consultants traveled to the island and incurred the expenses for the venture, Seven Arrows instructed senior officers with Trump’s company—then called Trump Hotels & Casino Resorts—how to make it appear legal by linking it after the fact to a charitable effort.

This comes just as the investigation into other ways Trump has misused a charitable foundation is exploding.

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